Songs of Salvation & Obedience

Songs of Salvation & Obedience

This week we have three Songs and Hymns that molded my earliest years as a Christian. As a Baptist ‘Amazing Grace’ and ‘What a Friend’ nurtured my faith and fellowship in Christ; my salvation was rooted in His work and love. As I grew those first few years, from my 17th to 21st year I struggled with Christian fellowship and rejection, which confused my journey, but did not hinder or halted it. Then as a non-Baptist my walk and talk with other Christians enlarged and increased my love for God’s family in Christ. Yet this too proved conflicting as fellowship and obedience, The third song and hymn is based on little Samuel’s encounter with the Voice of the Lord; and for me in my relations to other Christians and Brethren I found this Hymn a refuge for my turmoil.

1. Amazing Grace :” the enduring Christian hymn, is one of the most well-known and beloved spiritual songs ever written. It was penned by the Englishman John Newton (1725-1807).” Son of a Shipmaster, his mother died of tuberculosis two weeks before his 7th birthday; taken to sea at 11 with his father for several years; avoiding his father’s plans to send him to Jamaica to work on the sugar plantation when 17 years old, he signed up with a merchant ship to the Mediterranean Sea; at 18 captured and pressed into the Royal Navy service; at 19 he tried to desert, and was severely flogged with 96 lashes, and demoted; he wanted to murder the captain and then commit suicide ; he soon transferred to a slave ship bound for West Africa; rebellious with the crew, they left him in the hands of a slave trader; who in turn gave him to his native princess wife as her slave, who treated badly as a slave (I was once an infidel and libertine, a servant of slaves in West Africa”); three years later his father’s friend a sea captain in search for him, found and rescued him. But God was just beginning His great work: The ship encountered a severe storm off the coast of Donegal, Ireland and almost sank. Newton awoke in the middle of the night and, as the ship filled with water, called out to God. The cargo shifted and stopped up the hole, and the ship drifted to safety. Newton marked this experience as the beginning of his conversion to evangelical Christianity” and to Christ. . He eventually became an ordained minister in the Church of England; and an advocate to abolish slavery.

2. What a Friend: “”What a Friend We Have in Jesus” is a Christian hymn originally written by Joseph M. Scriven as a poem in 1855 to comfort his mother who was living in Ireland while he was in Canada. Scriven originally published the poem anonymously, and only received full credit for it in the 1880s.  The tune to the hymn was composed by Charles Crozat Converse in 1868. William Bolcom composed a setting of the hymn.” It is popular in Japan and Asia, in Hindi, and with English popular culture. It is found in most the Church Hymnals and SongBooks.

3. Master Speak: Havergal, Frances Ridley, daughter of the Rev. W. H. Havergal, was born at Astley, Worcestershire, Dec. 14, 1836. Five years later her father removed to the Rectory of St. Nicholas, Worcester. In August, 1850, she entered Mrs. Teed’s school, whose influence over her was most beneficial. In the following year she says, “I committed my soul to the Saviour, and earth and heaven seemed brighter from that moment.” “Miss Havergal’s scholastic acquirements were extensive, embracing several modern languages, together with Greek and Hebrew. She does not occupy, and did not claim for herself, a prominent place as a poet, but by her distinct individuality she carved out a niche which she alone could fill. Simply and sweetly she sang the love of God, and His way of salvation. To this end, and for this object, her whole life and all her powers were consecrated. She lives and speaks in every line of her poetry. Her poems are permeated with the fragrance of her passionate love of Jesus. Her religious views and theological bias are distinctly set forth in her poems, and may be described as mildly Calvinistic, without the severe dogmatic tenet of reprobation. The burden of her writings is a free and full salvation, through the Redeemer’s merits, for every sinner who will receive it, and her life was devoted to the proclamation of this truth by personal labours, literary efforts, and earnest interest in Foreign Missions.”

 

1. Amazing Grace!
John Newton, pub.1779 .Anonymous/Unknown, revised pub.1829

1
Amazing grace! How sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me!
I once was lost, but now am found;
Was blind, but now I see.
2
’Twas grace that taught my heart to fear,
And grace my fears relieved;
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believed.
3
Through many dangers, toils and snares,
I have already come;
’Tis grace hath brought me safe thus far,
And grace will lead me home.
4
The Lord has promised good to me,
His Word my hope secures;
He will my Shield and Portion be,
As long as life endures.
5
Yea, when this flesh and heart shall fail,
And mortal life shall cease,
I shall possess, within the veil,
A life of joy and peace.
6
The earth shall soon dissolve like snow,
The sun forbear to shine;
But God, who called me here below,
Will be forever mine.
7
When we’ve been there ten thousand years,
Bright shining as the sun,
We’ve no less days to sing God’s praise
Than when we’d first begun.

2. What a Friend We Have in Jesus
Joseph M. Scriven, 1855

1
What a friend we have in Jesus,
All our sins and griefs to bear!
What a privilege to carry
Everything to God in prayer!
Oh, what peace we often forfeit,
Oh, what needless pain we bear,
All because we do not carry
Everything to God in prayer!
2
Have we trials and temptations?
Is there trouble anywhere?
We should never be discouraged—
Take it to the Lord in prayer.
Can we find a Friend so faithful,
Who will all our sorrows share?
Jesus knows our every weakness;
Take it to the Lord in prayer.
3
Are we weak and heavy-laden,
Cumbered with a load of care?
Precious Savior, still our refuge—
Take it to the Lord in prayer.
Do thy friends despise, forsake thee?
Take it to the Lord in prayer!
In His arms He’ll take and shield thee,
Thou wilt find a solace there.
4
Blessed Savior, Thou hast promised
Thou wilt all our burdens bear;
May we ever, Lord, be bringing
All to Thee in earnest prayer.
Soon in glory bright, unclouded,
There will be no need for prayer—
Rapture, praise, and endless worship
Will be our sweet portion there.

3. Master Speak!
Frances R. Havergal, Ministry of Song, 1869.

1
Master, speak! Thy servant heareth,
Waiting for Thy gracious word,
Longing for Thy voice that cheereth;
Master! let it now be heard.
I am listening, Lord, for Thee:
What hast Thou to say to me?
2
Speak to me by name, O Master,
Let me know it is to me;
Speak, that I may follow faster,
With a step more firm and free,
Where the Shepherd leads the flock,
In the shadow of the rock.
3
Master, speak! Though least and lowest,
Let me not unheard depart;
Master, speak! For O, Thou knowest
All the yearning of my heart,
Knowest all its truest need:
Speak! and make me blest indeed.
4
Master, speak! and make me ready,
When Thy voice is truly heard,
With obedience glad and steady
Still to follow every word.
I am listening, Lord, for Thee:
Master, speak! O, speak to me!

About mjmselim

Male, 64, born in Jamaica, USA since 1961; cobbler for 40 years, Christian since 1969; married to same wife since 1979; 6 daughters and 2 sons, with 7 grandkids. Slowly adapting to the digital world of computers and internet; hobby in digital editing.
This entry was posted in Christian Poetry, Psalms Hymns Spiritual Songs, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s